Monday, 29 September 2014

The 3-year-old boy who weighs 11 STONE due to syndrome that means he just can't stop eating

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  • The Brazilian boy, known only as Misael, was born a healthy 6lb 6oz (2.9kg)
  • But every month since, has gained 6lb (3kg), meaning he struggles to walk
  • Doctors now believe he may be suffering from Prader–Willi syndrome
  • Rare, genetic condition characterised by constant hunger and desire to eat

The parents of a three-year-old boy who apparently weighs 11 stone say they are desperate for him to stop gaining weight.
The boy, known only as Misael, was born a healthy 6lb 6oz (2.9kg). 
But every month since then, he has gained 6lb - causing him to balloon in size and leaving him struggling to walk.
He now weighs 154lb, or 70kg, his parents say.  
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The three-year old Brazilian boy, known only as Misael, is said to weight 11 stone (154lb)
The three-year old Brazilian boy, known only as Misael, is said to weight 11 stone (154lb)
Misael was born a healthy 6lb 6oz (2.9kg). But every month since then, he has gained 6lb - causing him to balloon in size and leaving him struggling to walk 
Misael was born a healthy 6lb 6oz (2.9kg). But every month since then, he has gained 6lb - causing him to balloon in size and leaving him struggling to walk 
Doctors now believe he may be suffering from Prader–Willi syndrome, a rare genetic condition characterised by a constant hunger and desire to eat
Doctors now believe he may be suffering from Prader–Willi syndrome, a rare genetic condition characterised by a constant hunger and desire to eat
Doctors now believe he may be suffering from Prader–Willi syndrome, a rare genetic condition characterised by a constant hunger and desire to eat.
Children with the condition will eat three to six times more than others of the same age - and even then will probably still feel hungry. 
He also suffers from an underactive thyroid - which can cause weight gain - and his parents say medication to help treat this is not helping.
Misael's father Michael said: 'Even taking him to the doctor or leaving the house with him is difficult. 
'And when we walk down the street, people stop, want to take pictures with him, people say that they never saw [a boy] this size, people want to know how old he is, how much he weighs...'
Transporting Misael - who has behavioural problems - is so problematic that his family, from Cachoeiro de Itapemirim, Espirito Santo, are forced to hire a private taxi. 
His mother said: 'The doctors think he might have this syndrome that makes him gain weight. They want to do tests.
Children with Prader–Willi syndrome will eat three to six times more than others of the same age - and will probably still feel hungry
Children with Prader–Willi syndrome will eat three to six times more than others of the same age - and will probably still feel hungry
Misael also suffers from an underactive thyroid - which can cause weight gain - and his parents say medication to help treat this is not working 
Misael also suffers from an underactive thyroid - which can cause weight gain - and his parents say medication to help treat this is not working 
Symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) may include a permanent feeling of hunger, which can easily lead to dangerous weight gain, reduced muscle tone and learning difficulties. 
Sufferers may also display behavioural problems, such as temper tantrums or stubbornness. 
There is no cure for PWS, so treatment aims to manage the symptoms and associated problems. 
For parents, this includes dealing with their child's behavioural problems and excessive eating. 
Restricting a child's diet is a particularly important part of managing their condition. According to NHS Choices, while PWS itself is not life threatening, the compulsive eating and resulting weight gain can be.
Younger adults with the condition are at a much higher risk of developing obesity-related conditions usually seen in older adults, such as type 2 diabetes and heart failure.
Compulsive eating can also cause health problems such as an abnormally expanded stomach and choking. 
People who suffer from the condition also display behavioural problems, such as temper tantrums or stubbornness
People who suffer from the condition also display behavioural problems, such as temper tantrums or stubbornness


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